In the Library: Wherever There’s a Fight, How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers, and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California


Tuesday, May 19, 2020 6:00PM

In the Library: Wherever There’s a Fight, How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers, and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California





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In the Library: Wherever There’s a Fight, How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers, and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California


Where: California Historical Society Headquarters, 678 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94105

Cost: $15 General Admission, $10 for CHS Members.

Join CHS and Elaine Elinson and Stan Yogi, authors of Wherever There’s a Fight: How Runaway Slaves, Suffragists, Immigrants, Strikers and Poets Shaped Civil Liberties in California, as they discuss and present treasures – some dating back to the first decades of California statehood – that reveal the courage of many women and men who fought for the rights we enjoy today. While writing their book, they utilized ACLU-NC archives, which are housed at the California Historical Society, and include invaluable records about Japanese American incarceration during World War II, McCarthy-era loyalty oaths, and challenges to racial segregation in housing, education and jobs. Other documents used include records of civil rights struggles that long preceded the 1934 founding of the ACLU of Northern California.

About the Speakers:

Elaine Elinson served two decades as the communications director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California, and is currently a researcher/writer for the National Park Service on civil rights history. Her articles and book reviews have appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books, San Francisco Chronicle, Truthdig.com, The Nation, Woman’s Day and other publications. She currently serves on the boards of Yerba Buena Gardens Festival and Mesa Refuge Writing Residency. A former journalist in Southeast Asia, her first book, Development Debacle: the World Bank in the Philippines was banned by the Marcos regime.

Stan Yogi is co-author, with Laura Atkins, of the award-winning biography for young readers, Fred Korematsu Speaks Up. He is the co-editor of two books, Highway 99: A Literary Journey Through California’s Great Central Valley and Asian American Literature: An Annotated Bibliography. His essays have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, Los Angeles Daily Journal and academic journals and anthologies. He managed development programs for the ACLU of Northern California for fourteen years. He is currently researching a book on progressive Christianity.

Image Citation: (L to R) Lillian Harris Coffin, Mrs. Theodore Pinther, Jr. and Mrs. Theodore Pinther, Sr. leading a march of the California Equal Suffrage Association in Oakland 1908 August 27; General Subjects Photography Collection; California Historical Society; CHS2010.222